Pioneering Female Fieldworkers: Exploring Intellectual History of Archaeology and Anthropology

Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Event type: 
Academic



Tuesday 10 May, 1pm - 6.30pm
St Cross Room, St Cross College


Following from St Cross talks on the theme of early female fieldworkers in Michaelmas and Hilary terms, this workshop will bring together themes around women’s involvement in early travel-based scholarship. It will consider the educational, social and political background of early female explorers, travellers and fieldworkers along with their experiences in the field and their output and legacy in collections, publications, talks etc. The discussion will explore the need for such studies of women as well as what there is to be gained from studying their often neglected contributions and legacies.

The attendance at the workshop if free, but places for this session are limited, those interested in attending should send an email to Jaanika.vider@stx.ox.ac.uk with a few words about their particular interest in the topic. As with St Cross talks, many people attending the workshop choose to book themselves into Hall for dinner after the talks (at 7.15).

Mrs Janet Howarth, The Research University in England: experiences of early academic women, c.1890-1930

Dr David Hopkin, English Women Folklorists in Italy: Cultural and Political Activism after Unification

Dr. Alice Stevenson, The role of women in the establishment of Egyptian archaeology 1880-1910

Dr. Sarah Evans, Mapping terra incognita: women on Royal Geographical Society-supported expeditions 1913-1970

Dr. Alison Kahn, Collecting time and place: the ethnographic films of Beatrice Blackwood (1889-1975) and Ursula Graham Bower (1917-1986) 

Discussion lead by Dr Frances Larson

About the Speakers

Janet Howarth, MA, FRHistS is an emeritus fellow and former History tutor of St Hilda's College, currently working on research training in the humanities in British universities in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, and has published widely on various aspects of university history and women's history. 

Dr. David Hopkin is fellow and tutor in History at Hertford College. His research focuses on the oral culture of non-elite social groups in the nineteenth century. He has also worked on the disciplinary histories of folklore and anthropology, especially in France, Italy and Spain. He is author of Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Soldier and Peasant in French Popular Culture (Boydell & Brewer, 2002), and he co-edited, with Tim Baycroft, Folklore and Nationalism in Europe during the Long Nineteenth Century (Brill, 2012). He is currently working with colleagues at the University of Caen, Basse-Normandie, on the memory of early modern revolts in European oral traditions, as well as writing a book about the work culture of European lacemakers. 

Dr. Alice Stevenson is the Curator of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL. She works with museum collections and archives related to early fieldwork to explore a range of themes in prehistoric archaeology, including burial rituals, social identities, long-distance exchange and material engagement. These collections and archives also form departure points for her related interest in the history of the disciplines of archaeology and anthropology. She has worked with a broad range of archaeological material, especially during her post-doctoral research in the Pitt Rivers Museum (2009-12), but has a particular interest in Neolithic-Early Bronze Age Egypt and surrounding areas. 
Dr Stevenson is currently co-directing an AHRC-funded project with John Baines entitled 'Artefacts of Excavation: the international distribution of artefacts from British excavations in Egypt, 1880-1980', which is exploring the historical relationship between museum practice and international archaeological fieldwork. She is a Senior Editor for Oxford Handbooks online (Archaeology) and Chair of the Association of Curators of Egypt and Sudan.

Dr. Sarah L. Evans (Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)/Durham University, has recently completed an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award between the University of the West of England (UWE) and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) (RGS-(IBG), exploring women’s participation in RGS-supported expeditions between 1913 and 1970. Her research interests include: the history of geographical thought and practice, with particular reference to expeditionary thought and practice; historical geography and gender; feminist geographies; historical geographies of colonialism and postcolonialism; historical mobilities; the history of emotions and historical emotional geographies; and the nature, practices, and spaces of knowledge production. 
Alongside her current role as Professional Officer: Conference and Research Groups in the Research and Higher Education Department at the RGS-IBG, she is also Research Assistant on the AHRC-funded Hero Project, an interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary and historical attitudes to heroes and heroism, alongside colleagues from Durham University and the universities of Aberdeen and Birmingham. She is interested in exploring the uneasy intersection between ideas about heroism and expeditionary thought and practice, particularly as these relate to women’s access to and experiences of their expeditionary work in the early to mid twentieth century.

Dr. Alison Kahn (Senior Lecturer in Film at Oxford Brookes) trained to be a documentary filmmaker, museum curator and anthropologist at Goldsmiths College, University of London and the University of Oxford. She has worked as a producer and director for several broadcast channels including Discovery Channel with her own commissioned series.
As a specialist in visual and material anthropology she is interested in the use of multimedia as a tool for research and promotes a cross-cultural understanding of visual culture. She digitized 16mm film footage from the Pitt Rivers Museum in a project called Captured by Women: connecting the objects of the Pitt Rivers Museum to its film archives. The documentary produced as part of this project, funded by the National Digital Archive Fund and Screen South, is available on the Pitt Rivers website. Ursula Graham Bower- Pathways through her archive is a two-volumed ebook curated to present Bower’s life-story, films, photographs and object collections as an exhibition in a book. 
Alison is currently Media Curator for an e-book series telling environmental history stories using BBC digital and paper archive for an AHRC-funded project Earth in Vision at the Open University. The first e-book: David Attenborough Making Natural History will be out this summer.

Frances Larson received her doctorate from Oxford in 2004. She is the author of ’Severed: a history of heads lost and heads found’ (Granta 2014), which was a TLS book of the year and a Spectator book of the year in 2014. In 2009 she published ‘An Infinity of Things: how Sir Henry Wellcome collected the world’ (OUP 2009), which was a Sunday Times book of the year and a New Scientist best book of 2009. She is co-author, with Chris Gosden, of 'Knowing Things: exploring the collections at the Pitt Rivers Museum 1884-1945’ (OUP, 2007). She is in the early stages of writing a book about women anthropologists at Oxford.

Following from St Cross talks on the theme of early female fieldworkers in Michaelmas and Hilary terms, this workshop will bring together themes around women’s involvement in early travel-based scholarship. It will consider the educational, social and political background of early female explorers, travellers and fieldworkers along with their experiences in the field and their output and legacy in collections, publications, talks etc. The discussion will explore the need for such studies of women as well as what there is to be gained from studying their often neglected contributions and legacies.

The attendance at the workshop if free, but places for this session are limited, those interested in attending should send an email to Jaanika.vider@stx.ox.ac.uk with a few words about their particular interest in the topic. As with St Cross talks, many people attending the workshop choose to book themselves into Hall for dinner after the talks (at 7.15).

Mrs Janet Howarth, The Research University in England: experiences of early academic women, c.1890-1930

Dr David Hopkin, English Women Folklorists in Italy: Cultural and Political Activism after Unification

Dr. Alice Stevenson, The role of women in the establishment of Egyptian archaeology 1880-1910

Dr. Sarah Evans, Mapping terra incognita: women on Royal Geographical Society-supported expeditions 1913-1970

Dr. Alison Kahn, Collecting time and place: the ethnographic films of Beatrice Blackwood (1889-1975) and Ursula Graham Bower (1917-1986) 

Discussion lead by Dr Frances Larson

About the Speakers

Janet Howarth, MA, FRHistS is an emeritus fellow and former History tutor of St Hilda's College, currently working on research training in the humanities in British universities in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century, and has published widely on various aspects of university history and women's history. 

Dr. David Hopkin is fellow and tutor in History at Hertford College. His research focuses on the oral culture of non-elite social groups in the nineteenth century. He has also worked on the disciplinary histories of folklore and anthropology, especially in France, Italy and Spain. He is author of Voices of the People in Nineteenth-Century France (Cambridge University Press, 2012) and Soldier and Peasant in French Popular Culture (Boydell & Brewer, 2002), and he co-edited, with Tim Baycroft, Folklore and Nationalism in Europe during the Long Nineteenth Century (Brill, 2012). He is currently working with colleagues at the University of Caen, Basse-Normandie, on the memory of early modern revolts in European oral traditions, as well as writing a book about the work culture of European lacemakers. 

Dr. Alice Stevenson is the Curator of the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, UCL. She works with museum collections and archives related to early fieldwork to explore a range of themes in prehistoric archaeology, including burial rituals, social identities, long-distance exchange and material engagement. These collections and archives also form departure points for her related interest in the history of the disciplines of archaeology and anthropology. She has worked with a broad range of archaeological material, especially during her post-doctoral research in the Pitt Rivers Museum (2009-12), but has a particular interest in Neolithic-Early Bronze Age Egypt and surrounding areas. 
Dr Stevenson is currently co-directing an AHRC-funded project with John Baines entitled 'Artefacts of Excavation: the international distribution of artefacts from British excavations in Egypt, 1880-1980', which is exploring the historical relationship between museum practice and international archaeological fieldwork. She is a Senior Editor for Oxford Handbooks online (Archaeology) and Chair of the Association of Curators of Egypt and Sudan.

Dr. Sarah L. Evans (Royal Geographical Society (with IBG)/Durham University, has recently completed an AHRC-funded Collaborative Doctoral Award between the University of the West of England (UWE) and the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) (RGS-(IBG), exploring women’s participation in RGS-supported expeditions between 1913 and 1970. Her research interests include: the history of geographical thought and practice, with particular reference to expeditionary thought and practice; historical geography and gender; feminist geographies; historical geographies of colonialism and postcolonialism; historical mobilities; the history of emotions and historical emotional geographies; and the nature, practices, and spaces of knowledge production. 
Alongside her current role as Professional Officer: Conference and Research Groups in the Research and Higher Education Department at the RGS-IBG, she is also Research Assistant on the AHRC-funded Hero Project, an interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary and historical attitudes to heroes and heroism, alongside colleagues from Durham University and the universities of Aberdeen and Birmingham. She is interested in exploring the uneasy intersection between ideas about heroism and expeditionary thought and practice, particularly as these relate to women’s access to and experiences of their expeditionary work in the early to mid twentieth century.

Dr. Alison Kahn (Senior Lecturer in Film at Oxford Brookes) trained to be a documentary filmmaker, museum curator and anthropologist at Goldsmiths College, University of London and the University of Oxford. She has worked as a producer and director for several broadcast channels including Discovery Channel with her own commissioned series.
As a specialist in visual and material anthropology she is interested in the use of multimedia as a tool for research and promotes a cross-cultural understanding of visual culture. She digitized 16mm film footage from the Pitt Rivers Museum in a project called Captured by Women: connecting the objects of the Pitt Rivers Museum to its film archives. The documentary produced as part of this project, funded by the National Digital Archive Fund and Screen South, is available on the Pitt Rivers website. Ursula Graham Bower- Pathways through her archive is a two-volumed ebook curated to present Bower’s life-story, films, photographs and object collections as an exhibition in a book. 
Alison is currently Media Curator for an e-book series telling environmental history stories using BBC digital and paper archive for an AHRC-funded project Earth in Vision at the Open University. The first e-book: David Attenborough Making Natural History will be out this summer.

Frances Larson received her doctorate from Oxford in 2004. She is the author of ’Severed: a history of heads lost and heads found’ (Granta 2014), which was a TLS book of the year and a Spectator book of the year in 2014. In 2009 she published ‘An Infinity of Things: how Sir Henry Wellcome collected the world’ (OUP 2009), which was a Sunday Times book of the year and a New Scientist best book of 2009. She is co-author, with Chris Gosden, of 'Knowing Things: exploring the collections at the Pitt Rivers Museum 1884-1945’ (OUP, 2007). She is in the early stages of writing a book about women anthropologists at Oxford.